ROBERT MUGABE IN DETENTION AFTER MILITARY TAKES CONTROL — OUR WORLD

Robert Mugabe in detention at his home in Zimbabwe more than 12 hours after the military declared on national television that it had temporary taken control of the country to “target criminals” around the head of state. The move by the armed forces appears to have resolved a bitter battle to succeed the 93-year-old president, […]

via ROBERT MUGABE IN DETENTION AFTER MILITARY TAKES CONTROL — OUR WORLD

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Okombe murder suspects out on bail

The High Court in Nakuru has released two suspects charged with the murder of International rugby player Mike Okombe on bond. Justice Maureen Odero on Tuesday released Mr. Calvin Okoth and Miss Maryanne Mumbi on a ksh300000 bond each with surety.

The two denied the charges of killing Mr. Michael Shitindo Okombe on November 4 at a house in Olive Inn in Kiamunyi in the outskirts of Nakuru Town where they were attending a birthday party.

The bond application made by Mr. Kamau Chomba, the lawyer representing Miss Mumbi-Mr. Okombe’s girlfriend was allowed after the prosecution failed to challenge the suspects’ release. “Having there been no objections by the prosecution on the bond terms, the court directs that the accused persons be released on ksh 300000 bond each,” ruled Justice Odero.

An autopsy carried out by government pathologist Titus Ngulungu last week revealed that Mr. Okombe died due to internal bleeding after he was stabbed four times on different parts of the body. The report showed the player had four wounds in the chest and head.

Awiti, Magwanga supporters clash in Homa Bay Court

The hearing of a petition challenging the election of Homa Bay governor Cyprian Awiti was adjourned for more than 30 minutes after supporters of two opposing groups clashed. Governor Awiti’s supporters and those of former Kasipui MP Oyugi Magwanga fought outside the Homa Bay High Court on Tuesday morning.

Mr. Magwangha, who unsuccessfully competed against Mr. Awiti in the August 8 polls, is challenging the governors win. On Tuesday, a war of words began after each group consisting mainy youths accused the other of barring them from accessing the court where the hearing was to take place.

“You can’t block us from getting into the court because this is a public institution. We’ll enter by force!” One of the youth was heard shouting. The angry youth overpowered security guards and entered the court compound where they started shouting at each other. Efforts by security guards who were manning the gate to intervene did not bear fruits.

A similar verbal exchange was witnessed when Awiti’s lead lawyer Tom Ojienda arrived in the court. Lawyer Kanjama then requested Justice Joseph Karanja to order clients to talk to their supporters so they can keep calm. Mr. Karanja said that the environment for hearing the proceedings was not conducive.

A Profound and Deeply Moving Essay on American History — Truth Troubles

Originally posted on I don’t know much, but-: We, as a country, have come a long way since 1492 when Columbus sailed the ocean blue. Our history is full of progress and digress. Revolution and rebellion, and several instances of those two being one in the same. This particular essay begins in New York…

via A Profound and Deeply Moving Essay on American History — Truth Troubles

NATIONAL COHESION

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A country where there is no unity, stability or mutual understanding is a country where there is no cohesion. National Cohesion is the state of having mutual beliefs, values, practices, being one by having a common stand on matters but most importantly being at peace with each other.

Citizens in our country will be at each other’s throats, destroying properties, killing innocent victims, internally displacing each other all due to the fact that they do not share similar ideologies and political stands. Political leaders will insight and mobilize their followers to fight and kill their fellow countrymen who do not support the same political party as they do. But, ever stopped to wonder where you’ll be at the end of the day without that brother or sister you maimed innocently?

People have to learn to take a firm stand against political incitement. Let the politicians fight their own battles because tribe, color, race, religious or political beliefs do not define who we are, character does. The lay man loses at the end of it all since the economy deteriorates and the living standards go down while the earnings are minimal with a lot of spending since all energy is not devoted to working but to fighting a battle that is not even yours in the first place.

Let the Court system do its work, why take the law into your own hands while the Court can do that for you? Politicians have to learn that in a race there is always a winner and a looser. If the game is fair and transparent, why not learn how to concede defeat? They say politics is a dirty game but it doesn’t have to be like that. If politicians want to fight dirty let them, but do not accept to be used as their vessel in their political battles. Let them fight their own war.

We are one people, one country, the same blood color united by the love we have for each other. Do not let violence destroy that. Conflicts are not solved through shedding of blood but by talking it out and coming to an amicable decision suited to favor all people irrespective of tribe. In a country where 43 tribes are inhabitants, all we have to do is learn how to live with each other. Our strong cultures should make us one. Stand for peace, stand for unity, stand for togetherness and stand for love because that is what National Cohesion is all about.

What role do Election Observers play in an election?

European Union

Election observers are independent parties or organizations typically from another country or non-governmental organizations, primarily to assess the conduct of an election process on the basis of National Legislation and international election standards. The dramatic increase in election monitoring began with the fall of the Soviet Union and it continued throughout the 1990’s.

The first monitored election was that of 1857 Plebiscite in Moldavia and Wallachia (current Romania) that was monitored by most of the major European Powers. To date, election observing is still a thing and certain standards have begun to emerge.

Election Observers may be long-term or short-term observers depending on the organization they work for. The first thing that observers do is study the election law in the country to be observed. Organizations send  long-term observers to the country in advance of the election, to speak with Government Officials, Party Leaders, Members of the Press, Electoral Experts, Diplomats and Representatives of Minority Groups.

Short-term observers should have enough time to get a sense of the regions they are going to cover and pick about a dozen polling stations to scrutinize. On the election day, observers arrive at least an hour before a polling station is scheduled to open, to oversee preparations and how they are conducted by the officials of the respective Electoral Body.

Each observer carries a checklist of questions, which he/she consults as the first vote comes in. Some checklists encourage observers to interview a few voters at each polling station that they are observing with spaces to fill in their answers to some of the basic questions. At the bottom of the checklist the observer usually states his or her overall impression of the polling station. At the end of the day, observers will review the counting process either at the local or national level. They make notes on how votes are tallied. When the election is over, the various teams pool their findings and issue their reports.

Election observers are independent parties or organizations typically from another country or non-governmental organizations, primarily to assess the conduct of an election process on the basis of National Legislations and international election standards. The dramatic increase in election monitoring began with the fall of the Soviet Union and it continued throughout the 1990’s.

The first monitored election was that of 1857 Plebiscite in Moldavia and Wallachia (current Romania) that was monitored by most of the major European Powers. To date, election observing is still a thing and certain standards have begun to emerge.

Election Observers may be long-term or short-term observers depending on the organization they work for. The first thing that observers do is study the election law in the country to be observed. Organizations send  long-term observers to the country in advance of the election, to speak with Government Officials, Party Leaders, Members of the Press, Electoral Experts, Diplomats and Representatives of Minority Groups.

Short-term observers should have enough time to get a sense of the regions they are going to cover and pick about a dozen polling stations to scrutinize. On the election day, observers arrive at least an hour before a polling station is scheduled to open, to oversee preparations and how they are conducted by the officials of the respective Electoral Body.

Each observer carries a checklist of questions, which he/she consults as the first vote comes in. Some checklists encourage observers to interview a few voters at each polling station that they are observing with spaces to fill in their answers to some of the basic questions. At the bottom of the checklist the observer usually states his or her overall impression of the polling station. At the end of the day, observers will review the counting process either at the local or national level. They make notes on how votes are tallied. When the election is over, the various teams pool their findings and issue their reports.

Election observers are independent parties or organizations typically from another country or non-governmental organizations, primarily to assess the conduct of an election process on the basis of National Legislations and international election standards. The dramatic increase in election monitoring began with the fall of the Soviet Union and it continued throughout the 1990’s.

The first monitored election was that of 1857 Plebiscite in Moldavia and Wallachia (current Romania) that was monitored by most of the major European Powers. To date, election observing is still a thing and certain standards have begun to emerge.

Election Observers may be long-term or short-term observers depending on the organization they work for. The first thing that observers do is study the election law in the country to be observed. Organizations send  long-term observers to the country in advance of the election, to speak with Government Officials, Party Leaders, Members of the Press, Electoral Experts, Diplomats and Representatives of Minority Groups.

Short-term observers should have enough time to get a sense of the regions they are going to cover and pick about a dozen polling stations to scrutinize. On the election day, observers arrive at least an hour before a polling station is scheduled to open, to oversee preparations and how they are conducted by the officials of the respective Electoral Body.

Each observer carries a checklist of questions, which he/she consults as the first vote comes in. Some checklists encourage observers to interview a few voters at each polling station that they are observing with spaces to fill in their answers to some of the basic questions. At the bottom of the checklist the observer usually states his or her overall impression of the polling station. At the end of the day, observers will review the counting process either at the local or national level. They make notes on how votes are tallied. When the election is over, the various teams pool their findings and issue their reports.

Jaguar_Babu-Owino_STARPARLIAMENTARIANS TRADE BLOWS

Drama ensued in the precincts of Parliament after Starehe MP Charles Njagua and Embakasi East MP Babu Owino engaged in a fist fight. Trouble started after the Starehe MP accused Embakasi East MP of insulting President Uhuru. Before Babu could respond, Njagua started raining blows on him asking him desist in insulting the President.

Babu tried to fight back before parliamentary staff separated the two. They however continued insulting each other and Embakasi North MP James Mwangi had to step in. The two Jubilee MP’s tried to push the NASA parliamentarian outside the media Centre but were overpowered by the parliament staff that had chipped in. Even while being pushed out, Njagua vowed to never allow Babu to insult the president ever again as the hard headed Embakasi East MP insisted that President Uhuru.

“Uhuru is just an interim president, Raila is coming” Babu shouted as he was being pushed with Njagua and Mwangi struggling to reach him.